The Australasian Music Research Thesis Register: 1967-2007

We are keen to make this site as useful to those accessing it as possible. We welcome and encourage all feedback. All questions and suggestions should be directed to reg@musicresearchanz.com.


The webpages for the Australia & New Zealand Postgraduate Music Research Register and the underlying database were designed and created by Jamie Love and Stephanie Rocke in August and September of 2007. In October of the same year the Musicological Society of Australia was offered a licence to freely use the software.

These pages constitute the next logical step in the evolution of the local music thesis register; the history of the registers that precede it is outlined below. This register differs from previous registers in that it is designed to be a fully cumulative record of all music-related, awarded or "in progress" postgraduate projects in Australia and New Zealand since the first known degree awarded in 1917. That this expansion was possible is simply a result of the development and expansion of the internet. Whereas in the past, university music departments, libraries and authors had provided the details of completed theses to the various compilers, by 2007 the same information had become easily obtainable from the public domain. Collecting the information for this register was simply a matter of searching the appropriate online library catalogues.

While past registers included only those musicological dissertations emanating from the main tertiary music-teaching institutions in both lands, this register also includes completed theses from other disciplines, and theses from institutions that do not teach music as a separate discipline. In addition, some theses completed at overseas institutions that were either written by Australasian authors or cover Australasian topics have been included. No claims regarding comprehensivity are made with regard to these as they rely for the main part upon the submissions of the authors themselves. Finally, this register also includes postgraduate composition portfolios. Where this Register does not yet differ from those of the past, is in its “in progress” entries. As yet this register includes only projects from the main music-teaching tertiary institutions.

It soon became apparent that such an expanded, cumulative collection of records required a more sophisticated delivery vehicle and categorisation system than that which accommodated the earlier registers. Once again, the significant technological developments in database and website design over the past few years made this a straightforward task.


The MSA's primary on-going aim for this register is to catalogue all music-related postgraduate research projects in Australia and New Zealand and to make this information available to all interested parties in a format that is useful to them.

We strongly encourage all current postgraduates to register their project with us. Register your project now.

Australasian library catalogues are searched annually for projects that have been completed since our last search. The register is updated then and whenever a new project is submitted to us by a candidate, or when someone advises that their project has been completed.

Advise completed now

History


As musicology proliferated in Australian universities, so did a desire to "track" the development of the discipline, and to find out what was happening where. This spurred the late Sir Frank Callaway and Professor David Tunley, the founding editors of Australia’s first scholarly music journal Studies in Music - who were also active members of the Musicological Society of Australia - to publish the first music-related Australian and New Zealand thesis register in the first volume of their journal. Drawing upon a British model devised by Mr Paul Doe for its design, the first Australasian register was comprehensively named "Register of Theses on Musical Subjects Accepted for Higher Degrees and Research Projects on Musical Subjects In Progress for Higher Degrees at Australian and New Zealand Universities." Like today’s version the register was retrospective, including 54 theses from 1927 through until 1967, together with the details of 26 projects then currently in progress. From then on, a non-cumulative register of degrees awarded since the previous year’s register had been compiled appeared in every edition of Studies in Music, as did an updated list of “in progress” projects. 25 years later, in what was to become the final volume of the journal - number 26 of 1992 - Studies in Music had recorded the commencement of 850 theses, and the completion of 422.

In 1995, the editors of the MSA's own journal, Musicology Australia took on the task of publishing the register, with the Review Editor, Graham Strahle, supervising the enterprise. The MSA register was more succinctly named "Register of Australasian postgraduate theses in music," but was essentially the same in content as its predecessor, although the categories had been expanded a little and the "in progress" items were no longer separated out from the completed projects. The 1995 register contained details of projects completed or commenced since 1992. In following years, a rolling cumulative update was published in the journal, with four years of information contained in each volume.

By the turn of the century it became obvious that the best place for a thesis register had become the internet, and the data for all projects from 1992 to 1999 was uploaded to the newly constructed MSA website. The format and categories remained the same; however, it was now possible to retain all of the information in one place and simply add to it at regular intervals. The register, as it was just prior to the current register going on line, is available here. An excerpt from the first pages of the Studies in Music register has been reproduced below.

Many thanks to Professor John Griffiths, the 2007-2008 MSA President, and to his committee for their contributions in the final stages of the implementation of this project.

Stephanie Rocke (Nov. 2007- Mar. 2009)



Excerpt: Studies in Music Number 1, 1967: excerpted from pages 102-103



THESES ON MUSICAL SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR HIGHER
DEGREES
and
RESEARCH PROJECTS ON MUSICAL SUBJECTS IN PROGRESS FOR
HIGHER DEGREES
at
AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND UNIVERSITIES
(compiled by the Editor)

Arrangement: This is a modification of the plan devised by Mr Paul Doe in his register of theses on music undertaken by students of British universities (See R.M.A. Research Chronicle, No. 3, 1963, published by the Royal Musical Association).

      A. European Music

        I. Ancient and Medieval
        II Renaissance
        III Baroque
        IV Pre-Classical and Classical
        V Romantic (Nineteenth Century
        VI Twentieth Century

      B. Non-European Music
      C. Australian and New Zealand Music
      D. Music Education
      E. General Subjects.

      Universities represented
      Australia

        The University of Queensland
        The University of Sydney
        The University of Melbourne
        Monash University
        The University of Adelaide
        The University of Western Australia

      *New Zealand

        The University of Auckland
        Victoria University of Wellington
        The University of Canterbury
        The University of Otago.

Studies in Music. The present lists are believed to be accurate as at March 1967. Notification of any errors or ommissions would be appreciated.

(*prior to 1962 when these New Zealand universities became autonomous, degrees were granted by the University of New Zealand).


THESES ON MUSICAL SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR HIGHER DEGREES


A. I. EUROPEAN MUSIC: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL
. . .


A. II EUROPEAN MUSIC: RENAISSANCE



1.

Music in the English drama up to 1600.

Cannon H.
Queensland

M.A.

1927

2.

The English virginal school.

Waugh, D. F.
Otago

M.A.

1955

3.

The madrigals of Peter Philips.

Holland, R. J. T.
Sydney

M.A.

1962

4.

An investigation into harmonic and cadential procedure in the works of Tomas Luis de Victoria, 1548-1611.

Rive, T. N.
Auckland

PhD.

1963

5.

Tonal and modal resource in the Latin motets of William Byrd.

Gordon, G. E.
Otago

M.A.

1965

6.

The motets of Piere de la Rue (c. 1460-1518)

Rosenberg, R. M.
Sydney

M.A.

1965


A. III EUROPEAN MUSIC: BAROQUE


1.

The origins and development of organ music in 17th century Germany.

Steele, J.H.
Otago

M.A.

1952

2.

Some features of the rise in tonality in instrumental music up to the end of the 17th century.

Marinovich, V.M.
Otago

M.A.

1954

. . . . . . . . | | . . . . . . . . .



Known compilers of the various registers:

Studies in Music MSA Website
1967 - ?

Emeritus Professor Sir Frank Callaway (1919 - 2003) and Emeritus Professor David Tunley

2000(?) - ? Chris Wainwright
? - 1992
Musicology Australia Current Register
1995-6 Peter Campbell, Robyn Holmes, Jaki Kane 2007 Emily Giliam, Liz McLean, Rebecca Rocke, Stephanie Rocke, Patricia Shaw
1997 Peter Campbell and Jaki Kane 2008 Yu Lee An, Amanda Bettesworth, Rita Crews, Susan de Jong, Mark Pinner, Rebecca Rocke, Stephanie Rocke
1998-99 Jaki Kane 2009-now Stephanie Rocke

Top of
Page